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A couple of weeks ago SLUK were given an exclusive first ride on one of the Lancashire based company’s latest projects. Their prototype electric Scomadi. Although still in the early stages of development the protoype running on a modified Turismo Technica frame is rideable and as we were to find out, pretty quick as well.

VIDEO | On board the Scomadi Electric prototype

Scomadi projects

Before you all start asking ‘What happened to the 400 (tested here) and other Scomadi projects?’ Don’t panic, things are gradually getting back on track and development is still ongoing, both in the UK and at their new factory in Thailand.

There is also plenty more on the drawing board for future development so try to be patient. The 200 we tested recently is also on the way to the UK and half the first batch have been pre-sold, you can read Sticky’s review here and contact your local Scomadi dealer if you want one of the first 100.

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Above, Frank Sanderson fits a trade plate to the prototype before we could ride it.

Many of the test scooters/pre-registered scooters at Scomadi HQ are for sale. If you’re looking for a Scomadi it’s worth dropping them an email at: info@scomadi.co.uk

British motor

The electric Scomadi will use a British designed Saietta self-cooling motor, with final belt drive. It’s a highly-efficient motor designed by acclaimed British scientist Cedric Lynch and has set multiple world firsts on land, sea and air. The motor benefits from high power and low maintenance, it’s also self-cooling (although a side mounted fan will be added for extra cooling).

  • Motor: SAIETTA 119R-55
  • Power range: 7-12kw
  • Voltage: 48-72 volts
  • Maximum speed: 48v – 2600rpm/72 volt – 4000rpm
  • Rated torque: 48v- 26NM/72v- 30Nm
  • Motor weight: 12kg
  • Service intervals: 1000-3000 hours

Production battery should be removable and much prettier
Production battery should be removable and much prettier

Frankenstein’s Monster

At the minute the existing Scomadi frame has been modified to fit the bet drive motor and to accommodate the large battery pack. This is by no means a close to finished prototype. Even whilst I was at Scomadi HQ Frank was altering CAD designs for the frame and battery. The motor housing is also pretty agricultural and ugly to look at but for the minute it works and gives Scomadi an idea of what they need to alter to make it not only function well but also to look easy on the eye. The same goes for the battery, an existing ‘off the shelf’ battery pack has been used to get the scooter working, a new battery pack will be built specifically for the Scomadi.

What’s it like to ride?

I’ve ridden quite a few electric scooters and bikes, most of which (with the exception of Zero) have been equivalent to a 50cc or 125cc and haven’t really given me much to get excited about. The Scomadi is likened to a 200 by Frank, although to me it felt closer to a Vespa GTS 300, albeit this electric scooter accelerates so much quicker than a Vespa.

Like any twist and go, it’s easy enough to ride. Although you certainly notice the extra weight of the battery packs as you wheel it around. These are likely to be condensed before it’s production ready, they’ll also sit lower in the frame to give a lower centre of gravity. Having said that though, the Scomadi felt great once it was moving.

It shifts, that’s for sure. Open the throttle and it responds instantly, although Frank told us they’ve actually detuned the motor (or turned the power down) to stop it using as much juice and to make it less fierce when you pull away. They’ve lowered the rear tyre size to compensate and the extra gearing that modification has made is enough to make it usable and easy to ride.

The extra weight of the battery means the standard suspension is working beyond its limits so hitting bumps gives a good old jolt. Minor details like that can be sorted in good time. Even though the suspension is hard you can still ride this thing and enjoy it. It put a smile on my face during my brief test ride. I saw 74mph on the clock, it felt quick as well so I’d expect a genuine 70mph in its current form.

Silence is golden

As with all electric scooters, the first thing you really notice is the silence. With nothing more than the faint whirr of the motor, the tyres against tarmac and the wind whistling by it’s a strange feeling. An electric scooter may not have the heartbeat of an engine but when you start to feel performance like this it makes a world of difference.

Ignore the wiring, it's been spliced together in the same manner as a gypsy hooks up to a lamp post
Ignore the wiring, it’s been spliced together in the same manner as a gypsy hooks up to a lamp post

When can I buy one?

We first saw the proposed Scomadi electric motor almost a year ago, it’s taken a while to get to this stage and Scomadi have bigger fish to fry first. Even so, Frank told us “We’ll have a production prototype ready to ride in six months.” Electric technology moves fast and by the time a production-ready version is available battery and motor technology will have advanced once again. We should see the initial launch into the UK and Europe later this year, the rest of the world will follow. Contact Scomadi to register your interest.

In an ideal world, Scomadi will be able to increase the range, lower the weight and be able to make it cost effective by the time it arrives. The current projected cost is around the price of a Casa engine.

Test ride it

If you’re heading to the Newark show in this weekend (5th-6th January) you can test ride this machine whilst you’re there (weather and test track permitting).

Words, photos and video: Iggy

New products always in development…

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