A little later than planned, Bill Mac gives us the lowdown in part 2 of his Scomadi 200 Stage 3 kit review. This time he’s putting it back on the Dyno… 

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Well folks in part one I told you that I’d fitted the FIM – Fuel Injection Module, variator and sports exhaust to ‘Poppy’ my Scomadi 200. I played with the settings on the FIM and settled on the base settings, plus one on both modes (you can see on the image above what does what).

6 mph increase

Just prior to fitting the kit the top speed for my Scomadi was 76mph, as verified by my GPS. Afterwards it was 81mph, over the next few weeks this improved to 82mph an improvement of 6mph.

The newly fitted replacement Scomadi speedo is much better than the original one and is consistently + 6mph, so that means it was reaching an indicated speed of 88mph – which of course should have activated my Flux Capacitor.

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I had intended to Dyno the scooter straight away on the same dyno I had used for my initial long distance test of the standard Scomadi 200 many months ago. Unfortunately Paul Baker’s dyno at SRP Racetech had died and it could be a few weeks before it was up and running.

So I went to Bill’s at Tiverton Motorcycles to use his dyno to get an idea of what the improvements would look like. Bill is an ex-scooterist and Lambretta man and he loved the Scomadi, he took it for a ride and he was well impressed. Luckily Bill is also an ace welder as we noticed two cracks in the PM exhaust when we rolled her up the ramp to the dyno.

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I remembered when we fitted the exhaust we had to push down on it to fit the bolts for the attaching brackets. That meant she was under tension and sure enough the crack was around the neck of the exhaust by the spring fitting. The other crack was on the bracket which secures the tube that runs up the inside of the muffler. Bill quickly re-welded the exhaust, altering its angle so the bracket screws easily slide in. I contacted PM and Paul Melici reckoned I may have got an early pre-production down pipe fitted to mine as the angles on these were later changed. They offered me a new exhaust but I’m happy with Bill’s welding so will keep it for now.

Anyway if you’re fitting these exhausts be warned the bracket bolts should not have to be forced in… If you have to force them something is wrong.

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Anyway back to this first dyno trial and I got an improvement of just under 2bhp and it was now putting out 17.8 bhp (albeit on a different dyno). Next I loaded the wife and my rally kit up and with a few other scooters I headed off to the Woolacombe rally. I was the only scooter two-up but my Scomadi easily kept up with the rest of the scoots, which included a GTS 300 and Lambretta GP225, as well a few Vespa PXs and an LML.

I was also flabbergasted that the kit seemed to have no real effect on the range of the scoot, she was still returning on average between 60-70 mpg which means a comfortable range of 150-160 miles. Also two up on the way back on a flat section of the M5 she still managed to hit 78-80 mph, which was ace. I checked and was happy to see there was no increase in engine temp despite the upgrade and extra performance. I was quite happy and decided I would take her in for a service at Wildcat then dyno her on Paul’s dyno once it was fixed.

AN FP 200 being pressure tested at the height of the controversy
AN FP 200 being pressure tested at the height of the controversy

Issues? What issues?

Before that a new controversy reared its head. It broke on Facebook, some Scomadi 200s were having trouble, some were cutting out and generally running erratically at idle. A few allegedly had compression problems and melted pistons. Facebook was running wild with theories and rumours and I got a bit paranoid every time I went out on my scoot. However this problem seemed to be on standard Scomadi 200s.

When I fitted the upgrade kit mine had cut out a few times at idle but I’d adjusted the idle mode on the FIM. Some people adjusted the idle speed up by adjusting the stop on the fuel injector with an allen key or by adjusting the throttle cable under the handlebars. By forcing the scoot to idle at a higher rpm it stopped some cutting out but wouldn’t do much for your fuel economy. Of course if you had the upgrade fitted you could adjust the mode 1 band on the FIM to do this.

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It turned out one or two scomadis may have also had some excess glue break off from inside the plastic airbox, which then got into the barrel, melted and these were the low compression ones. These were (I am told) all fixed under warranty and the cutting out and poor idle problems would be fixed by a fuel flow remap of the fuel injector ECU, which would be done free by your dealer.

It turns out the scoots affected were from across both of the first two batches of 200’s and these were unrelated to the upgrades. As news of the problems circulated on social media and dealers were being flooded with calls from worried owners, Scomadi were already in China with Magneti Marelli working on a remap to sort out the problem.

Scomadi then issued the dealers an option of doing a remap to cure the problem, this would be covered under Scomadi warranty. Anyway I opted to head back to the gang at Wildcat Scooters to have a new belt fitted to my scooter, a service and be the first to try the new remapping procedure. I had planned to get this done in the morning and then head over to Paul Baker’s in the afternoon to use his dyno, which was now back up and running.

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The remapping is done by downloading the latest map from Scomadi. Then you plug the remapping device into the socket (that lives by the fuse box on the engine under the right hand panel) and control it via a suitable phone which has the relevant remap and app downloaded onto it.

The guys and Claire at Wildcat Scooters soon sorted me out and I urge anyone to get in touch with your Scomadi dealer if yours is cutting out. I quickly headed back across the bridge and raced down the M5 to where Paul lives to play on his dyno.

Graph 1: standard Scomadi (red) v Vespa GTS 300 (blue)
Graph 1: standard Scomadi (red) v Vespa GTS 300 (blue)

As you can see from the graphs and on the original one with my Scomadi 200 vs GTS 300 my Scomadi hit a max power of 15.95 bhp and the power dropped away at about 75mph whilst the GTS hung onto its power to 80mph and then it dropped off.

Graph 2:
Graph 2:

The second graph is my Scomadi with the kit fitted, the red line being the final run and the blue one just a warm up test run.

The line shows my Scomadi hits 17.45 bhp and is still producing 15bhp just like the GTS at 80mph and then reaches 85mph before it drops off. It is also noticeable that the Scomadi produces more power earlier on than the GTS as well. When you remember the Scomadi weighs 22.5 kg less than the GTS this explains why for only a 1.5bhp increase the Scomadi now has the edge over the big Vespa. Its not just how much power you can produce but how you use it that seems to count.

Second opinion

I can also confirm a friend of mine has had the upgrades fitted to his Scomadi 200 and had his tested on a dyno and confirmed his was producing around 17.5 bhp. Now the clever thing the upgrade does is not just produce more power but the way it produces it earlier to give it more acceleration and then hangs on to it a lot longer than the GTS to help its top end. Mine has gone from 76mph to 82mph top end and that is a great improvement for a four stroke and with hardly any effect on the range or fuel consumption, which astonished me.

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Well thrashed

So will it last? Well my GTS at one stage was racking up over 500 miles a week with serious commuting and like my Scomadi I thrashed it everywhere. By the end of each year the top end speed was dropping off as I wore a groove into the variator and flats on the rollers. I expect this to be the same on the Scomadi if I abuse it. I could see the yearly pre-season service being a new belt, rollers and variator if I want to keep its top end up. Some of you may go ‘wow that’s a lot’ but my friends, when you tune a scoot that’s what you have to expect. I remember my GP200 with its Honda 205 conversion needed new clutch plates every six months. Elsewise I do not foresee any problems, I know it can get mapping upgrades should they be needed and I am confident in the upgrades.

So is it worth it? Nearly £600 for the kit for +6mph improvement? Well the standard Scomadi 200 is good for 76mph and that is great but you can spend up to £600 for exhausts that look good, sound good but produce no real performance improvement. However this £600 actually does the job and we have the stats to prove it. Now a different dyno on a different scoot on a different day may produce a higher bhp figure and someone lighter could get a better top end (for instance my speeds are with me sitting normally not with my head tucked down behind the headset). All I can say is bring on the 400…

Special thanks to the gang at Wildcat Scooters, Paul Baker at SRP Racetech and Bill at Tiverton Motorcycles.

Words and photos: Bill Mac

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