VIDEO | BSSO 2017 classes explained

Open Development Class

The new ‘Open Development Class’ allows recent ‘external stud’ engines from the likes of Quattrini, Casa Performance, Gran Turismo and Tino Sacchi to take to the track for the first time.

Open Development allows a crucible for all these new parts to be tested and perfected in the hands of experienced racers before the engines filter out onto the streets.

Given that some of these motors are expected to produce over 50hp and will rocket classic scooters to way over 100mph, it’s great that there is now somewhere that they can all compete and evolve.

PSN awarded Justin Price a new brain as a spare...
PSN awarded Justin Price a new brain as a spare…
Veni vidi vici (we came, we saw, we conquered)
Veni vidi vici (we came, we saw, we conquered)

Automatic Production Class

 

‘Automatic Production Class’ Follows on from the undeniable success of the Vespa/Lambretta Production Class introduced in 2016 and hopes to pull the same trick of getting more bums on seats.

The rules for this are still in development but these will specify one Piaggio-based 172 engine which can be used in a variety of chassis including the Scomadi.

SLUK's Barrie enjoys the spoils of victory
SLUK’s Barrie enjoys the spoils of victory

LCGB Production Class

 

The current Lambretta/Vespa production class has been a massive success with 18 riders taking part this year.

For 2017 the rules have been tweaked:

  • For Lambretta a Mk2 Franspeed race exhaust has been added as an option with better ground clearance.
  • For Vespa, crankcase inlet porting has been permitted.
  • PMT tyres have been added as an option to Mitas
  • All competitors to the class must now be members of the LCGB

Winners: BSSO Championship sponsored by Casa Lambretta

Barrie recieves the restored original Milan-Taranto trophy donated by Tino Sacchi for winning Production Class
Barrie recieves the restored original Milan-Taranto trophy donated by Tino Sacchi for winning Production Class

Speaking of Production Class, do you know that Team SLUK rider Barrie Braithwaite won the inaugural championship.

To my knowledge this is the first time that a magazine team, particularly one as underfunded and scruffy as ScooterLab.UK have ever won a scooter racing championship in Britain.

Our SLUK trophy went to Andy Walker – the best finishing novice rider in Production Class.
Our SLUK trophy went to Andy Walker – the best finishing novice rider in Production Class.

Taking the win in Group 4 (standard Lambrettas to 210cc) was Steve Conneely of Replay Racing.

Steve also claimed the overall BSSO championship (worked out from points in all classes). He added the third Conneely name to the trophy following his brothers’ victories in the previous 2 seasons.

Group 4 and overall champion Steve Conneely
Group 4 and overall champion Steve Conneely

Gaining overall victory in the hard-fought Group 6 class was Italian rider Luca Zani. He was not only the first foreign rider to win a British race championship, but also the first to win the 260cc race class using a ‘smallblock’ Casa SS200 kit.

Luca Zani - the first foreign winner of Group 6
Luca Zani – the first foreign winner of Group 6

Justin Price won the large capacity autos (Group 6a) class on his PSN ‘Zipper’, while Steve Graves won the group 10 (80cc) autos championship and with that the best newcomer award.

Justin Price with PSN boss Andy Pearson
Justin Price with PSN boss Andy Pearson
Vittorio Tessera presents to Class 10a winner Steven Graves
Vittorio Tessera presents to Class 10a winner Steven Graves
Davenport & Davenport - sidecar champions
Davenport & Davenport – sidecar champions

Sidecars are due for a revival in 2017 with lots of new machines coming out, but this year’s champions – Davenport and Davenport will be hard to beat.

For full championship results, click here.

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