7 Comments

  1. john62784
    7th November 2019 @ 10:50 am

    The scooter may look more Innocenti than Lambretta but as the article says they have kept the essence but brought the technology forward.
    To use the old blueprint would I feel corrupt the classics. There are so many that are now not truly being restored but rebuilt using non original components of admittedly a better standard.
    We all have our own reasons why we love scooters. To some it’s rekindling their youth and to others it is the joy just being out there.

  2. Zap Brannigan
    7th November 2019 @ 12:52 pm

    The Lambretta G325 is on my wish list for 2020 if the Scomadi 400 doesn’t appear. It is stunning.

    Whilst keeping to the original heritage marque silhouette it is a 21st century evolution, far closer to an original Lambretta than the GTS is to an original Vespa to my mind ( having owned 4 GT/S since 2004 and never truly “loving” the styling).

    As a mature rider who uses two wheels to commute, I need a motorway competent machine that keeps faith with my Moddy sense of the aesthetic but equally does not lend itself to being bedecked with chrome tat.

    I am not prepared to thrash to death a 60 year old 2T machine on big roads and compromise my safety anymore. If anyone has noticed there are twice the number of cars and trucks on the road than when most of us started riding and the traffic is much faster too. So for me, the old 2T is strictly for pottering around town in the Summer but scooters like the GTS and this Lambretta are for rallying and commuting in comfort.

    Bravo New Lambretta!

    • enoble
      8th November 2019 @ 7:40 pm

      Got to say I agree with you there. As Iggy says in the article this is probably pretty close to how a Lambretta would have looked if we British hadn’t bought Innocenti and immediately trashed it. I was in MSC a few weeks back, I’ve got an LI S2 and a Vespa T5, but I too want a commuter (come spring!). I saw the GTS up close and it’s a lovely thing – yes I’d prefer a geared 2T but those times are gone (and besides I have two of those already). Thing with Piaggio is they evolved the GTS. What RA and Scomadi have done is a pastiche of the 1960s – which is a legitimate approach if that’s your thing. The new Lambretta people seem to have taken their inspiration from the Piaggio approach. Could it be done better? Of course. The exhaust looks a bit odd, and why oh why don’t they slap an extra fiver on the price and give us fork boots? A little detail like that would make all the difference. So I’m definitely considering it, just need the road tests now. The RA scoots look ok but from what I can see they’ve shafted a British company run by a scooterist. Talking of which, I’ve been waiting 3 years now to hand Scomadi my £5k or so for the 400 or the rumoured geared 250, but I’m not even sure they exist anymore: shame. Looks like we’re back to Vespa vs Lambretta – who’d have thunk it in 2019.

  3. Nik Skeat
    7th November 2019 @ 12:59 pm

    Mixed feelings here,none of which concern the user of the name. Firstly, as you point out, the styling is very much “an up to date version”. Hmm. To me it looks like an up to date version from 2005. It needs further updating to truly being it into the modern era.
    Secondly, those bloody wheels make the chassis look too small. Off the top of my head, there is only the GT/GTS range that have avoided this, and we all know how big they are as a result. Aesthetically though, it needs more balance here.
    Finally.. The courtesy light. If I bought one, guess what would be the first thing I’d remove? Naffer than a box full of naff things.

  4. Nudger
    8th November 2019 @ 2:48 pm

    Sure it’s a Lambretta:
     Manufactured in Taiwan (I think)
     CVT gearbox – belt drive
     Fuel Injection
     4 Stroke
     Engine might be Sym or Honda
     Monocoque bodywork

    And they have the cheek to say ‘Get Real – Go Real’ on their website! I’m the opposite of Nik Skeat in that it’s the use of the Lambretta lineage, imagery and the monetisation of our passion for a branding exercise that annoys me most. If this product is ‘not meant for us’ why was it launched at Euro Lambretta 2017? Answer: undeserved kudos.
    If Walter Scheffrahn is confident of his design then let him create a new brand, stand on his own feet and begin to build a new history with this scooter. Having said that, I do understand why RLC are involved; an enormous sum is being invested to bring new exciting products to market for the real Lambretta owner and this all costs them money. They have to think of the future and a lucrative youth market which will not be realised in our second hand machines. For those that disagree; I’ve got a new Ferrari on my driveway I’d like to show them.

  5. paul d
    8th November 2019 @ 8:25 pm

    I’m glad the lambretta name is still around. Sym or honda engine??? A machine carrying the lambretta name deserves better. It’s not offensive to look at and with 325cc it’ll move along nice and with metal bodywork it should last but to me it all seems a bit skoda. Very effective cars with a badge carrying a proud history but would you ever lust to own a vw one?

  6. hattori_hanzo
    10th November 2019 @ 6:55 pm

    With Walter having legally shutdown everyone using the Lambretta name, I’d have thought it obvious why Rimini LAMBRETTA Centre have remained allied to this sham.

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