It looks like we started an international arms race with our feature on the Chiselspeed Quattrini M210 Lambretta before Christmas. Chiselspeed had opted for the simple bolt-on approach, rather than welding transfers to provide extra meat for tuning on the small block engine and the results were still very impressive.

 

The Germans don’t like to be left behind though and within a few days of our road test, Boris was at the MMW Dyno in Bavaria to witness this 28bhp Quattrini bursting into life…

 

Iggy

 

Quattrini dyno

 

It is really funny how, when a new tuning part comes out for our old Italian shopping mopeds, a worldwide race is on to be the first to test and evaluate its potential. We have mentioned before that the new Quattrini 210 kit had been a hot topic in the German Scooter Forum, and it was only days after we featured the Quattrini-powered Chiselspeed Lambretta, that the Germans had their first Quattrini M210 engine on the dyno.

 

Welded transfers

 

The engine has been built by Rainer Büsch, a well known figure within the German Lambretta tuning scene, so expectations were high. Contrary to Chiselspeeds bolt-on approach, Rainer opted to weld up the transfer area on his Lambretta casings to be on the safe side and have enough meat to fully use the transfer size available from the kit. As no bespoke crank was available for the Quattrini, he used a 58mm Tameni crank, rebuilt with a 116mm Dodecimila con-rod.

 

Apart from that, the engine is built from rather standard items – a 28mil Keihin carb, plus a TSR Evo exhaust. In order to do a quick first test run, the exhaust had not been adapted to the Quattrini’s different flange angle, but just stuck on provisionally. Also, Rainer had not altered anything about the transfer timing, giving 180-degree exhaust and 122-degree transfer duration as intended by Quattrini.

 

SLUK 72 2 1
SLUK 72 3

 

MMW test rig

 

Bearing in mind the provisional arrangement of the exhaust, it came in handy that the test run was carried out at MMW’s. The company, located in the middle of nowhere in Bavaria, specialises in CNC-machining and manufacture a range of high-end tuning goodies offered by the big German shops, from Lambretta brake calipers to CNC-machined cylinder heads. They not only have their own dyno but have also built a special test rig for Lambretta engines to use without the need to fit them to a bike just for dynoing purposes.

 

It is always an experience for me to stand next to a scooter on the dyno, but the engine fitted openly in the test rig made things even more impressive. Rainer’s engine ran happily from the first attempt (and with exactly the same carb setting as a TS1 engine tested before).

 

 

VIDEO | Dyno run

Plenty of torque

 

A major hiccup was caused by a severely slipping clutch that had to be cured by fitting a Liedolsheim clutch before any useful attempt at full throttle could be made. This already indicated that there was some power to come, and the end result was even better than expected. The engine put out a peak performance of more than 28hp at just over 7000rpm. Even more impressive is the high torque output of 30Nm and the fact that the engine continuously produces more than 20hp over the range from 5500rpm to 8450rpm – which is exactly where you’re normally riding a scooter on the road. Bearing in mind the timing is just as standard and only a 28mm carb has been used, this is really a brilliant result.

 

The dyno chart shows over 20hp from 5500 to nearly 8500rpm, with a peak of 28.2 and 30.07nm of torque.
The dyno chart shows over 20hp from 5500 to nearly 8500rpm, with a peak of 28.2 and 30.07nm of torque.

 

Conclusion 

 

The German test once again confirms the Quattrini kit is a great alternative for any small block Lambretta, and I’m quite sure it will not take long until a good selection of cranks with the necessary dimensions and a range of exhausts for different purposes will be available for it.

 

Spanish casings

 

What’s left is the issue of the engine casings – Italian casings really can cause problems here, whereas late Spanish casings should work out ok due to their larger spigot area. So I was rather a happy chappy when I found I have two Spanish casings still kicking around…

 

Words, photos and video: Boris Goldberg

 

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